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An STC GOLD Community (2016)
and Pacesetter (2012)
and APEX winner (2016)
The Technical Editing SIG focuses on issues related to technical editing. Our goal is to provide editing resources and leadership for STC members who want to learn more about technical editing and its important contributions to our profession. Learn more...

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Wanted: Summit Proceedings Designer needed (volunteering opportunity)

Author: Webmaster - Published At: Apr 26, 2017 02:51pm EDT -
STC News
The STC Summit Committee is looking for someone who can
"spend a weekend or a few nights pulling the submitted pieces together (which STC has been collecting from the website page ). The bulk of the job is compiling, organizing, sorting, and light editing of the presenter submissions into a single Word document — nothing really fancy or involved.

The content should already be complete and formatted by speakers, according to the instructions and Style Guide . We don't look to do a thorough review or make any substantial changes to content (maybe spell check and look to fix obvious formatting problems). Also, submissions are allowed to trickle in until the time of Summit (past the stated deadline), so the work on the proceedings document can be completed shortly after Summit.

noteNote:
The 2016 Proceedings Paper was compiled and built using Adobe InDesign (we have source files available), but this is not a requirement for 2017. STC does not offer or supply any software. Expectation is that a comparable proceedings document can be collated using Microsoft Word and published as a PDF.


Here is a link to a description of the Summit Proceedings Designer role . (Thank you for putting the description together, Michael Opsteegh!)

From the description:
  • Time Commitment:
    Developing the proceedings publication takes approximately 15–25 hours. The work is independent, so you can arrange your own time. Traditionally, the proceedings were available at the Summit. In recent years, the proceedings have been published shortly after the Summit.

  • Recognition:
    The proceedings designer is recognized as a volunteer member of the STC Conference Committee group and receives editor credit and recognition in the published document. The designer is also able to reference or showcase a sample of the proceedings paper as a part of their portfolio (with STC permission).


If you're interested, please email stcsummit at gmail.com.

April announcements: STC Technical Editing SIG

Author: Webmaster - Published At: Apr 03, 2017 09:57am EDT -
SIG News
Don't be "foolish" and miss these great evetns from your STC Technical Editing SIG this month!
  • STC Summit 2017 Update
  • STC Election Results
  • Free STC webinar, Apr 11
  • Monthly volunteer meeting, Apr 13
  • TEAM (Technical Editing Active Member) Rewards Program
  • SIG Resources
  • New member welcome

March announcements: FREE webinar, watercooler chat, Summit info, and more!

Author: Webmaster - Published At: Mar 01, 2017 10:00am EST -
SIG News
Keep that "spring" in your step, and take advantage of all that your STC Technical Editing SIG is offering this month!
  • Free STC webinar, Mar 2
  • Monthly volunteer meeting, Mar 9
  • Watercooler chat, Mar 14
  • STC Election
  • STC Summit 2017 Update
  • Volunteer Needed for TE SIG Secretary Position
  • TEAM Rewards Program update
  • SIG Resources
  • New member welcome


TE SIG Highlights and Accomplishments for 2016

Author: SIG Leaders - Published At: Dec 15, 2016 09:00am EST -
SIG News
It’s been a busy year for the Technical Editing SIG. We have a lot to be proud. Here is a summary of the SIG’s highlights and accomplishments.

Thank you to all our volunteers—we couldn’t have done any of this without you.

Thank you to all our presenters—you helped us bring top-notch learning opportunities to our members.

Thank you to all the members who participated—you helped make our programs successful.

Preventing Eye Strain While Working on a Computer

Author: Webmaster - Published At: Dec 07, 2016 03:06pm EST -
Corrigo Articles
The more you use your computer, the greater the risk you’ll encounter a repetitive-stress injury (RSI) such as carpal tunnel syndrome. That’s not because computers are inherently harder on your body than (say) jogging, but rather because the problems are subtler and develop over longer periods. (Unless you jog 8 hours per day.)

Read more in "Protecting Yourself from Injury While Using a Computer" - Part 3: Eye Strain
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